Guinness is Good for Nips

Read Bros. Dog's Head, found on Jess Kidden's Guinness in America site.

Read Bros. Dog’s Head, found on Jess Kidden’s Guinness in America site.

Our old friend Jess Kidden dropped in to share this nip nugget: “The word NIP is a trade-marked name owned by Read Bros. And may not be used on any other brand than Dog’s Head.” The full clip can be found on his Guinness in America site. He added that he:

Came across a booklet put out by one of the US importers of Guinness and Bass in the immediate post-Repeal era the other day.  Alex B. Shaw, Inc. imported the Guinness bottled by Read Bros., Ltd. of London under the Dog’s Head label (from my research, it seems that the Guinness bottled and imported from E. J. Burke might have been more prevalent in the US market).

Funnily enough, the day after we received this email, we saw a replica metal sign for Dog’s Head. Glad to know that, had we been around exactly 80 years ago, we could’ve bought a carton of either 4-dozen nips of Guinness or Bass.

This claim by Dog’s Head also made Kidden remark, “Makes me want to go through my files and see how many US brewers’ ads used ‘Nip’ specifically (as opposed to the casual use by consumers, bars, etc).  Off hand, the first one I thought of was this Butte ad:”

Thanks for keeping the nips slippin’, Kidden.

Submitted by Jess Kidden

Submitted by Jess Kidden

Half Bassed

IMG_1870Found this li’l 25-cl beauty in an Italian beer bar. Does that make it a nipolo, a nipello, or perhaps a nipini?

Flesjes in the Netherlands

25cl=8.45oz. Easy Doos It

Madeleine Carlson:

In Rotterdam, with my cousin Olaf, when I told him I was too jetlagged for a beer, he suggested I just have a flesje:)Can’t remember which beer it was. Amstel is really good there, too.
(Ed. note: Fles means “bottle” in Dutch. Adding –je makes words diminutive, ergo flesje is a nip bottle.)