The Devil is making my big-little dream come true!

Duvel is one of the most iconic beers on Earth. This benchmark for the Belgian Strong ale style is devilishly tasty, but it also packs a wicked strong kick at 8.5% ABV. So what’d they do two days ago? They nipped it in the bud (sorry, shouldn’t say Bud here). The Dutch love putting beer–any beer including Grolsch–into little bottles and even have their own word for it, “flesje.” In short, Duvel, Brabantian for “devil,” is now available in 18-cl nip bottles (just 6 oz.)!

"Groots bier, kleine fles"

“Groots bier, kleine fles”

From their website, with Google Translate on:

GREAT BEER, SMALL BOTTLE

21/03/2014

Duvel Moortgat today launched the Mini, a great addition to the range of this family, Belgian specialty beer brewery….Each bottle of Duvel 18cl Mini instead of 33cl. Contains These irresistible little Duvel is marketed for lovers of distinctive tastes, quality preferable to quantity.

With Duvel Mini can be extra enjoyed all the different beautiful moments of the day: a drink after work, an appetizer at dinner or during a nice evening in a grand café. Duvel Mini is now available at the supermarket and in the hospitality industry and better …put in a seductive campaign.

CHARMING BOTTLE

The Belgian specialty beer has a striking, distinctive bottle that fits the unique taste: on the supermarket shelves are now the next big bottles of Duvel Mini bottles with the same design…Duvel Mini also offers quality and great taste delight to enjoy the little moments that ask for a glass of specialty!

 

We houden nips (15 cl)

Greetings from the Netherlands! Long story small because this is about all things small, we moved to Amsterdam for the next two years. And already we’re discovering that it’s a small world after all. The Dutch, it seems, love drinking things 15 centiliters at a time (that’s 5 ounces for those who haven’t gone metric), from suds to sodas.

Take this sampler of a fantastic IPA from Dutch brewery, er brouwerij Maximus. They sure pack a ton of (American) hops into this 15-cl serving.

Brouwerij Maximus High Hops/Low-volume

Brouwerij Maximus High Hops/Low-volume

And this can of Coke, “Champagne American,” found at the supermarket.

I'll have a finger of Coca-Cola

I’ll have a finger of Coca-Cola

Of course, the beer was €3 and the Coke was €0.45, but both are perfect nips.

Ride the Champagne ponies

Credit: Danny Kim

Credit: Danny Kim

Thanks, Niki Ganong, for posting this li’l nugget on my FB wall. It seems that Andrew Knowlton, Bon Apétit’s The Foodist, is in the know when it comes to nips of beer. He blurbs, “Miller High Life ponies, the seven-ounce guys, are standard at any Foodist party. Why? They chill down quickly, they finish fast so they never get warm, and…You might call them cute, too.” While I can’t say I whole-heartedly agree with his taste in beer–the snob in me would say a Miller High Life pony bottle is perfect because you only have to drink 7 ounces of it–he still uses sound reasoning and I’m glad to know their vintage ponies are back. If I find ’em, I’m seriously picking ’em up for my next cookout.

 

 

Time Out New York. Time In Half Pints

Time Out New York‘s new issue is all about “NYC’s Greatest Beer.” It’s like 7 pages of beer reporting from the brewing kings of Queens to haute beer-infused fare. There’s one section called “Out with the old, in with the brew” by Christopher Ross about new trends in beer. Our favorite? “The half pint is the new pint.”

With the explosion of beers on the market–and so many of them carrying fearsome ABVs–the 16-ounce pour can prove unduly limiting. As suds destinations like Proletariat and the Pony, the eight-ounce version has gained ascendance among in-the-know drinkers, who favor the new serving size for encouraging a wider sampling of drafts and being easier on the wallet and liver.

I’ll raise a toast to little glasses in the Big Apple.

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21A Lowers de nips

BDHkieRCQAA4peXIn a first for American craft beer in cans, San Francisco’s 21st Amendment Brewing unveils its American-style barleywine, Lower de Boom, in a proper British-style nip package, albeit aluminum rather than glass keeping in line with all of 21A’s packaging. Says co-owner Shaun O’Sullivan,  “Historically, barleywines, with their high alcohol, were brewed for their winter warmer quality…Enjoy one now and lay another can down as this beer will age quite nicely as the hops pull back and the malt and complex flavors meld together.”

Adds co-owner Nico Freccia, “When they were first brewed, barleywines were almost exclusively sold in small bottles and we wanted to recapture that tradition in a new way, with a new can. Plus, at 11.5% alcohol, any larger a serving and you might feel like the boom has been lowered on you!”

There we have it: one of the very few beers you can say is worthy to “lay another can down” and the only one packaged in a responsible portion, 250 mL or 8.4 oz, as historically intended.

Nippon’s Nips

Photo: Tokyo5

It’s been brought to our attention that our use of, nay, championing of “nips” can be offensive or viewed as derogatory to some, but we assure you that nips as it pertains to beer has its origins in German, Dutch, and/or olde English. It just so happens that the Japanese Kirin Beer comes in some of the best nip cans we’ve ever seen. Yes, there’s the classic 250 mL one, but dig it–a 135 mL half-nip! A nip blip. Perfect for when you only want…a sip.

Rocky Mountain Nips

The 375 ml bottle (or 12.7 ounces) is “a perfect size to have by yourself or share over dinner,” (Crooked Stave‘s Chad Yakobson) said.

Photo: ThreeBarrelBrew.com

That line is from Eric Gorski’s latest post in his First Drafts blog on DenverPost.com. Gorski’s in the enviable position of writing about beers, events–and trends–in the Colorado brewing scene (and showing some love to others in equally enviable positions around the country such as the PacNW). The post, “Goodbye bomber? Boutique breweries switching to smaller bottles,” shows Colorado brewers such as Crooked Stave in Denver and Three Barrels in the southwest corner eschewing bombers and 750s and espousing 375 ml bottles! Brilliant! And now they’re on record doing it for all the right reasons (pricing, responsible portion, and a new one: risk-aversion). We’ve had the pleasure of trying Crooked Stave’s beers, meeting Chad, and even writing them up, and look forward to discovering Three Barrels beers. (Good thing we have family in nearby Durango.) Finally, as someone commented on the blog, “…this is great news! I appreciate the difference in price too as that has always kept me from being able to try everything I was interested in.” Go small or go home!